Jobs for 13-year-olds

Jobs for teenagersIt can be tough to find suitable jobs for 13-year-olds, when many employers won’t hire teenagers until they are 14, or even 14 and 9 months.

In most states of Australia, however, it is perfectly legal to start working at 13, and some states have no restriction on starting age, depending on certain conditions.

Check the table below for the minimum legal working age in your state, and click the link for further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked in your state.

State Minimum age for starting part-time work
ACT None.

Exception:

  • Minimum age 14 and 9 months to do door-to-door sales work.
  • Written permission required by the employer for children under 15.
NSW 13 years.

Exceptions:

  • Children can deliver newspapers and advertising leaflets from the age of 11, but they can’t do delivery work between 6.00pm and 6.00am until they are 13.
  • There is no minimum age for working in a family business or in the entertainment industry.

Further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked

NT None.

Further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked

QLD 13 years.

Exceptions:

  • Children can deliver newspapers and advertising leaflets from the age of 11, but they can’t do delivery work between 6.00pm and 6.00am until they are 13.
  • There is no minimum age for working in a family business or in the entertainment industry.

Further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked

SA None.

Further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked

TAS None.

Exception:

  • You are not permitted to sell things in a public place if you are under 11.

Further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked

VIC 13 years.

Exception:

  • There is no minimum age for working in a family business or in the entertainment industry.
  • Children can deliver newspapers and advertising leaflets from the age of 11.
  • There are further restrictions if you are under 15.

Further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked

WA Parental/adult supervision required at 10, 11 and 12; written permission required at 13 and 14.

Exception:

  • There is no minimum age for working in a family business or in the entertainment industry.

Further information on laws and restrictions regarding age and hours worked

 

Types of jobs for a 13-year-old

Regardless of the laws in your state, many employers will have their own rules about employment age. For example, McDonalds won’t employ anyone under the age of 14 in NSW, NT, SA and Tasmania, or 15 in Victoria. KFC will only employ teenagers who are at least 14, or 15 years old in Victoria.

But there are lots of other jobs that younger teens and tweens can do. Not everyone has a family business they can start working in while young, so we have put together some ideas on where a 13-year-old (or tween) can find some part-time work.

  • Doing errands
  • Casual work in and around a private home
  • Work related to sporting activities such as being an umpire, referee or tennis court attendant
  • Clerical work – such as filing and photocopying
  • Helping out at extra-curricular activities such as music or drama schools and sporting clubs
  • Work as a cashier
  • Gardening
  • Babysitting
  • Modelling
  • Performing arts (including film, television, theatre)
  • Golf-caddying
  • Delivering newspapers and pamphlets
  • Assist at Out of School Hours (OOSH) care centres for primary schools
  • Making deliveries for a registered pharmacist
  • Working as a shop assistant
  • Dog walking
  • Car washing
  • Collecting aluminium cans for recycling and cash (do an online search for scrap metal dealers in your area; SA and NT both have a container deposit schemes)
  • Pet sitter
  • Computer and/or website maintenance (for the technically minded)

How to find jobs for a 13-year-old

Most of the larger employers with websites have a section for job-searchers. But if your child is under the minimum age for those employers, they might need to work a little harder to find a job. Here are some suggestions.

  • Put the call out to family friends
  • Advertise your services on the noticeboard at your local supermarket*
  • Visit local stores
  • Advertise on Gumtree*
  • Ask teachers at school for work such as babysitting, gardening, lawn mowing, car washing etc
  • Ask the teachers/leaders of after-school activity groups and OOSH care centres

* Parents: make sure you approve the ad and attend any meeting with your child.

 

This article was researched by intern Brenda Fry. Find out more about The Kids Are All Right internship program.

Some of the above information has been drawn from the following websites:

Lawstuff – information about the legal age for beginning work.

Legal Aid Victoria – suggested light work for young people.

Other articles in our job series for teenagers

Resume for teenagers

Christmas jobs for teenagers

 

 

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Comments

  1. i think that kids my age (12) should be able to baby sit and walk dogs and earn money

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